These are the biggest challenges marketers are facing with mobile

| September 26, 2017

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Research by Incite Group and Open mobile media, has revelaed in their latest State of Mobile report, that content is marketers biggest challenge. Even with advancement in technology, creating the right content and relevant content is still as important as ever, as that's essentially what mobile marketing (in terms of mobile applications and mobile websites) comes down too, the right content.

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Established in 2005, Juhll is an expert team of agile digital marketing specialists servicing mid-to-enterprise level clients. Everything we do is measured with 100% transparency in cost and bottom-line revenue performance.

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How Can I Make A Blog?

Article | December 14, 2020

When I decided to do something on my own, I stumbled across blogging. Now, the question was, how can I make a blog? There are two types of blogs that you can make - a free domain blog and a paid domain blog. With the help of free blogging platforms like WordPress and Blogger, you can create a free blog. However, you won't get a full domain name dedicated to your free blog. To get the complete domain name for your blog, you'll have to buy a domain and hosting, which is a paid blog. So, How Can I Make A Blog? Follow the five steps below: Step 1: Decide The Niche of Your Blog The first step to making a blog is to decide its niche. What is it that you want your blog to be about? There can be many niches from which you can choose. Travel, food, health & fitness, online marketing, business, arts, entertainment, affiliate marketing, sports, and automobiles are some of the examples. You need to ask yourself what your passion is and what you want to write about. This is probably the most crucial step in making a successful blog. Without knowing the niche for your blog, you may not be able to make it work, and it won't be worth your efforts. Step 2: Choose the Domain Name of Your Blog The second step is choosing the domain name. You will need a name that suits your blog's niche and the topics of your blog posts. If your blog is about sports, choose a name that goes with it. It could also be completely unrelated. However, you should know how a blog's name will affect it. If someone searches your blog's name on Google, then it will show up. However, if your blog's name is unrelated to its niche, then it may be difficult for you to rank it on the Google search results. Step 3: Free Domain or Paid Domain? Do you want a free domain or a paid domain & hosting for your blog? There are many free website-building platforms where you can build and publish a blog. The most famous and reliable platform is WordPress. After making an account on WordPress, you can create a free blog using the free website builder. You'll have to do some basic settings, and you'll be well-guided along the path. You can change the theme from the default theme to any of the available themes. In the end, you'll have to register your domain name and finally publish your blog online. You'll have WordPress's branding in your domain name once you publish it. It'll look something like - www.YourDomainName.wordpress.com. If you don't want such branding and want your own domain and hosting, then you can opt for WordPress's self-hosting service. When using WordPress's self-hosting service, you'll get to register an entire domain name without the WP branding. It'll look like www.YourDomainName.com. For this, you'll have to pay a monthly hosting charge of $2 to around $10. Step 4: Customize The Look of Your Blog After building your blog and registering the domain name, the next step is customizing your blog's looks. WordPress has many themes (both free and premium) that you can install on your blog. These themes will change the look of your blog and make it beautiful. There are around 8000 WordPress themes available to choose from, and you can purchase any of the premium WordPress themes. Step 5: Write and Publish Your First Blog Post The final step in the quest to making a blog is writing your first blog post and publishing it. Go to the dashboard of your blog and click on 'Add new post.' You can include images, videos, and all forms of multimedia in your blog posts. For better search engine ranking results, try and write long blog posts (>2000 words). Do not copy from other websites. Write something on your own and completely unique. While formatting your blog post, make sure you use H1, H2, and H3 headers in your blog post. Also, keep your sentences shorter and easy to read. You should check out HubSpot's guide on how to write and format a blog post. I hope that you now have a pretty decent idea about building a blog all by yourself. If you want to know more about blogs and blogging, keep reading our other posts. Until next time, take care and keep blogging!

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How to Do Corporate Branding Right

Article | March 15, 2020

A ton of people confuse branding with a company’s logo. When they hear the word “branding,” they immediately picture designers hard at work choosing the perfect shades and template for a new logo. But although a logo is part of branding, it’s not the whole package.

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Roots vs Risk: How companies can effectively create a new culture and customer-base

Article | February 10, 2021

It’s common for brands to become stagnant, rooted in their ways and too set on a specific course which restricts their ability to adapt to change. It is the classic example of the “That’s the way we do things around here” mentality. But over time, competition increases, markets develop and consumer needs shift. Consequently, very few industries have remained static over the past year let alone the last decade, which has created an urgent need for businesses to evolve. This notion is backed by Matthew Hayes, Managing Director of Champions (UK) plc, a strategy-led growth agency in the brand, digital and communications space. In this piece, he explains how digging up a business’ roots can actually help sow the seeds for a successful future. Letting go of your roots Resistance to change is one of the greatest barriers to a business’s long-term success. This resistance is often the result of a business becoming too attached to its roots, which can sometimes be so deep that they begin to act as an anchor, weighing the business down rather than enabling its growth. These roots can be categorised as values, goals and characteristics of a business that define how it operates, the messages it communicates, the way in which it conveys them, as well as how consumers perceive the brand. But as times change, it is common for business roots to become outdated and unsuitable for the current commercial climate. And as a result, businesses begin to face difficulties in keeping customers engaged and in turn, achieving a profitable financial return. To see this in practice, we only need to look at the demise of some the biggest named brands in recent times. For example, the Arcadia Group is one of the latest victims of digital transformation, a trend that has been gradually impacting the retail space in recent years, and that has only accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic. The digital shift has been led due to the need to meet changing consumer expectations and behaviours, with online sales are increasing year on year, and even more customers are expected to be shopping with a digital-first perspective following the pandemic and its related disruption. Instead of responding to the change in the market and embracing online opportunities, businesses operating as part of Arcadia Group continued to do things as they had always done. And it was this lack of focus on their digital offering, particularly when compared to competitors such as PrettyLittleThing, boohoo and Asos, that ultimately resulted in their commercial downturn. Although not so great for the individuals effected in the process, the case offers other businesses a vital lesson in the importance of letting go of outdated roots and adapting to change. Taking a risk But due to the deep-rooted nature of such characteristics, there is a perceived risk involved with letting them go. It’s understandable as it will no doubt involve a significant change to business as usual. But, any risks can be mitigated if businesses take a strategic approach in their decision to make change. For instance, by undertaking branding exercises, such as a brand audit and the formalisation of a value proposition, stakeholders can gain an in-depth understanding of the business’s current position, its offering and their consumers’ expectations, through the creation of audience personas and its market via detailed industry insights and competitor analysis. From here, there will be a clear view of which aspects are not appropriate for the current commercial landscape, and where there will be opportunity to enjoy the fruits of your labour once change has been implemented. Once a new proposition has been established in theory, it then needs a detailed project plan to role it out in a practice, combined with an effective communications strategy. Taking a look at an example from our own experience. We rebranded Delta Global, a packaging provider for luxury retailers that, at the time, was doing great things with regard to innovation, technology and sustainability but was failing from a branding perspective to communicate its capabilities in those areas. Our branding exercises helped to redefine the business’s values, creating a four pillar model that communicates them much more clearly. Formed of innovation, sustainability, luxury and ecommerce, clients and stakeholders can now, at a glance, understand exactly what the business does and how it does it. And to ensure the business and its position only benefited from the activity, it was complemented with a robust communications strategy. This gained the brand exposure in industry-leading titles, including Forbes, WWD and The Sunday Times, as well as a greater presence across social media channels. This helped mitigate the risk of unsuccessful change through use of effective communication targeted at new audiences, existing customers and internal stakeholders, who now understand the new direction but also be on board with it. Is change always necessary? In short, no. Change for the sake of change can actually be just as damaging to a brand as staying consistent. This is because sometimes, the deep-rooted characteristics of the business form a vital part of the audience’s understanding of the brand and its offering. This might include family-run business values or branding elements that are connected to the location a business was founded in, for example. Often, it’s unlikely that these elements will be hindering the business’s growth potential, but are instead, adding value to it by acting as a USP and differentiating it from the competition. However, in these cases, while the message does not need to change, the way in which it is communicated might, as often, it is the methods of message delivery that become outdated. For example, this might mean making better use of online marketing channels such as social media, content creation, SEO and email promotions to support both online and offline activities. It’s all about making well thought out changes in order to remain relevant, rather than constantly altering your messages and offerings, which could actually cause confusion and disconnect between the brand and its consumers. Ultimately, businesses need a solid footing upon which they can build on. But while these foundations are important for business growth, like a tree’s roots, some often go off at a tangent and become stuck in the past, anchoring the brand to where it used to be rather than allowing it to move forward into the future. Put simply, if you don’t evolve, you die.

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10 Do’s and Don’ts of Market Research Translation

Article | December 22, 2020

Most influential organizations need international market research as it helps formulate growth strategies and decision-making processes. Market research translation allows businesses to understand clients’ expectations, conduct competitive analysis, make educated business decisions, and much more. Surveying multilingual consumers is challenging in multiple ways, requires language expertise, and has zero room for errors. A single mistake, miscommunication, or misunderstandings can adversely impact a company’s progress in local and international markets. Many organizations hire business translation services firms for their expertise in the sector. Here are some do’s and don’ts of translating market research to understand the complexity of the task. The Do’s: 1. Native Speakers When translating surveys, questions, and instructions, working with native speakers allows questionnaires to sound more natural and helps respondents feel comfortable when answering. Additionally, having native translators who have or are living in your target research area will help them understand the respondents better. Your translators will understand the local language and colloquialisms as well as make the questionnaire easily accessible. 2. Background Information Your market research translation services firm should have all the necessary background information to understand your research scope and objective, along with ensuring its accuracy. Your translators should know what kind of information you need from respondents to ask the correct questions in the target language. In addition, the linguists who translate the answers would also require a complete discussion to comprehend the precise meaning of the statements made. 3. Avoid Leading Questions Ensure that your survey has minimal leading questions, if any. Such questions decrease the accuracy of your research by guiding respondents toward specific answers. Typically, leading questions might confuse your respondents. They might answer in a different way than they would in normal circumstances. This may alter your research results and give you an erroneous image of the local market, which can impact your company’s positioning adversely in the long term. 4. Review of Target Participants Depending on your survey region, you may need to adapt your research methods to include real-time conversations, phone interviews, besides online questionnaires. You may need to create new classes of participants for your study due to population structure variations. If required, you can reorganize your target audience categories, their number, and how you contact them. 5. Test Study Methods Your business translation services team should test the questionnaire on a sample before you go live to ensure that all your respondents understand the instructions and questions. This also helps you avoid vague messages and poorly translated, indistinct questions. Invest some extra billing hours in testing to ensure the accuracy of your research. The Don’ts: 1. Not Going Beyond Word-to-Word Translation Market research documentation involves surveys, questions, videos, interactive content, and more. Along with terminology and grammatical rules, translators require details, like the respondents' voice pitch, body language, and idiomatic expressions for successful translations for the project. 2. Overlook Cultural Aspects Researchers cannot ask the required questions or conduct a qualitative analysis of the answers without cultural insight. They simplify communication between the respondents and the translator and enable you to represent the local market accurately. Integrating cultural nuances into the research helps you create an emotional connection with the respondents and results in more accurate answers for your analysis. 3. Ignore Data Security Adhering to data security protocols builds trust among your local audience and reduces the risk of problems with local authorities. If your questionnaires have sensitive data, avoid any data security breaches. This builds trust among your local audience and reduces the risk of issues with the law. If you take assistance from a language service provider, they should ensure that your research results and the respondents’ data are protected. Usually, your translation agency will have strong data security measures to keep your files safe and secure. 4. Forgetting to Proofread Translating market research involves concepts that cannot always be compared in all languages, brand perceptions that differ with the region, varying local social norms for communication, and several other aspects that influence the translation and localization process. Get survey results checked and proofread by the research team before sharing them with your management and stakeholders. This ensures that analysts use accurate data to make their predictions and removes any mistakes from the document. 5. Have Fixed Deadlines Your market research results will determine your product launches, fresh marketing strategies, and development. Proper documentation for multilingual market research needs time and patience, as rushing through the entire process can be counterproductive. Rushed translations and skipping critical phases of research might result in the omission of essential data and altering the analysis results. This could lead to a false assurance that pushes you in the incorrect course. Multilingual market research requires translating both the instructions and surveys that enable you to investigate local markets and local respondents' data.

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Juhll Agency

Established in 2005, Juhll is an expert team of agile digital marketing specialists servicing mid-to-enterprise level clients. Everything we do is measured with 100% transparency in cost and bottom-line revenue performance.

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