Strong Use Cases Emerging For AI-Powered Marketing Applications

Kim zimmermann | March 11, 2020

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The addition of artificial intelligence (AI) to the traditional marketing ecosystem can help businesses leverage real-time customer interactions to automate routine tasks and personalize responses to convert more leads. Many tools in the marketing tech stack including marketing automation, customer relationship management systems and content management platforms incorporate AI to some degree already, and it is becoming more pervasive. AI is already being applied by many B2B marketers with substantial success. According to the most recent Gartner Marketing Technology Survey, marketing leaders rated AI as their first choice of emerging technologies that will have the greatest positive impact on marketing over the next five years. The growing use of automated chatbots, text and other tailored marketing messages all require a strong AI foundation to provide a more human-like interaction, the report noted.

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MediaVest

Mediavest, a division of Starcom MediaVest Group (SMG), is one of the leading, full-service media specialist companies offering brand-building results and business solutions for our marketing partners. Starcom Mediavest Group architects connected human experiences to create value for our clients through precision marketing, content and technology solutions. Ranked the number one global network by AdAge and RECMA, SMG partners with the world's leading marketers and more digital disruptor brands than any other agency network. With 8,000 employees and 110 offices worldwide, SMG's network includes our three global agency brands Starcom, Mediavest and Spark; content brands LiquidThread, MRY and Relevant24; and ad tech units, RUN, Audience On Demand and more. In 2014, SMG (www.smvgroup.com) was named the top media network at Cannes, Eurobest, Dubai Lynx and Festival of Media Global. SMG is part of Publicis Groupe [Euronext Paris FR0000130577, CAC 40], one of the world’s leading communication

OTHER ARTICLES

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Article | February 1, 2021

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Spotlight

MediaVest

Mediavest, a division of Starcom MediaVest Group (SMG), is one of the leading, full-service media specialist companies offering brand-building results and business solutions for our marketing partners. Starcom Mediavest Group architects connected human experiences to create value for our clients through precision marketing, content and technology solutions. Ranked the number one global network by AdAge and RECMA, SMG partners with the world's leading marketers and more digital disruptor brands than any other agency network. With 8,000 employees and 110 offices worldwide, SMG's network includes our three global agency brands Starcom, Mediavest and Spark; content brands LiquidThread, MRY and Relevant24; and ad tech units, RUN, Audience On Demand and more. In 2014, SMG (www.smvgroup.com) was named the top media network at Cannes, Eurobest, Dubai Lynx and Festival of Media Global. SMG is part of Publicis Groupe [Euronext Paris FR0000130577, CAC 40], one of the world’s leading communication

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