How Community Coalitions Are Bridging the Digital Divide

| August 25, 2020

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Across the country, local networks known as Education Innovation Clusters (EdClusters) are bringing together partners and resources to meet urgent needs and envision a new future for teaching and learning. Many of these efforts are rooted in long-standing partnerships across sectors and institutions. As COVID-19 disrupted the lives of students, educators, and families earlier this year, EdClusters sprang into action, leveraging their capacity and reach in ways their networks were uniquely ready to do. Their collective efforts are meeting a range of needs—from internet access to devices to social-emotional supports. As schools prepare for uncertain and complex reopenings, we turn to Kansas City and Rhode Island for powerful examples of community in action.

Spotlight

Cohley

Cohley is a content generation platform that connects brands to a network of creators and professionals. It all began in 2014, when then co-workers Erik Graber and Tom Logan recognized an opportunity for creatives to proactively search for the right brand collaborations, instead of the other way around. They saw firsthand the powerful role of content across branding and performance, and founded Cohley two years later.

OTHER ARTICLES

New Business Remains Resilient Despite Decrease of 10% in H1 2020

Article | August 4, 2020

The holding companies might be losing as much as 23% of their revenue year-on-year, but new business has remained relatively resilient through 2020. In the first half of 2020, according to independent marketing consultancy R3, total New Business revenue decreased 10% globally – but creative agencies are having to find ways to do more with less.

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How Intent Data Activates the Marketing Cloud

Article | August 4, 2020

Why is the digital marketplace ascending and demanding the attention of more B2B sellers? Clearly, with COVID, anything digital is popular and necessary. The crisis has accelerated digital transformation, forcing everyone into more digital marketing. As a result, B2B marketers are having to learn a lot of lessons very fast, while their revenue objectives haven’t gone away. This has pushed faster adoption of digital technology for digital marketing and demand generation. So naturally, as the digital space is growing, so is interest in running martech from the cloud, instead of cobbling together point solutions for different channels like display and content syndication. That time has passed. We’re entering the era of the marketing cloud: an integrated suite of solutions available as web-based services delivered via software-as-a-service.

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How To Translate Key Marketing Data into ROI for Your Brand

Article | August 4, 2020

"Marketing ROI is far from an exact science," says Ashley Schuetz, vice president of marketing at Massage Heights. "It needs to be looked at holistically because it is so challenging to attribute one specific marketing vehicle to an overall conversion." Franchise brands must know their core customer and the value of that customer to decide on marketing and measurement tactics and strategies - and then be ready to adjust and measure again and again. The right data can help brands select key performance indicators (KPIs) that correlate with the company's strategic goals. These can include increasing sales or conversions, raising brand awareness, or boosting website traffic, for example. Once that is decided, the next task is to craft strategies to target the right customer with the right message at the right time - and find ways to measure and analyze the results.

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CONTENT MARKETING

Shoppable social media: future predictions from an influencer expert

Article | August 4, 2020

Who would have thought one-year ago that popular high-street stores would now be closing their doors for good? Or, that some of the country’s biggest brands would decide to focus solely on ecommerce? Well, neither did we. But due to the coronavirus pandemic, that is exactly what has happened for many businesses, particularly within the fashion industry. Now, we are living in a world completely dominated by social media and ecommerce, but what exactly does the future hold? Here, we speak to Amelia Neate, Senior Manager at influencer marketing agency, Influencer Matchmaker, where she shares her predictions for the future of shoppable social media and social commerce. The rise of ecommerce As we have seen throughout the last 12 months or so, there has been a huge influx in the number of ecommerce businesses coming to the forefront of their respective industries. And this probably wouldn’t have happened without Covid-19. In fact, it definitely wouldn’t have. The effects of the coronavirus pandemic have had a tremendous impact on several industries and sectors, many of which have been negative. However, it has accelerated the growth of ecommerce by approximately four to six years. And, following the closure of numerous brands within Arcadia Group and physical stores in the form of Debenhams, it is proof that brands must ensure they stay relevant and adapt to the ever-changing needs of their consumers. Social commerce: why is it so important? Not only has ecommerce taken a front seat recently, but we have now welcomed a new industry trend aboard. A similar concept to ecommerce, social commerce consists of the buying and selling of a product or service within a social media platform. With the number of social media users continuing to rise, and with 53 million active social media users in the UK alone, it is no surprises that brands and businesses have implemented a brand-new strategy to help boost sales. And, with 75% of businesses intending to dedicate an entire budget to influencer marketing throughout 2021, it makes perfect sense for them to be targeting their consumers more directly - which is exactly what social commerce does. Social commerce was well on its way to success in 2019, way before the pandemic had even hit, having generated an impressive $22 billion in the US alone. Social media is no longer simply a place to be confronted with tailored and personalised ads, but is a destination to shop and make purchases, too. Currently, Facebook and Instagram (which is owned by Facebook) have a shoppable feature within their apps. This allows brands, businesses, and anyone else with a business account to link directly to a product within their image, taking consumers straight to the product page of their website. What’s more, they are able to do all of that without even leaving the app they were originally on! Brands such as Zara and John Lewis are just two of the huge names that are utilising the apps and their new shoppable features. In doing so, this allows consumers to shop and purchase products without having to sacrifice their time on social media. We are all familiar with the likes of Instagram Stories and their popular swipe-up links. Well, this is taking it just that little bit further, and I don’t think it is going to stop there. The future of social commerce Shoppable social media is only going to become more widely used, and before we know it, we will be able to purchase an item with just one click – making it even more streamlined than it is currently. With features such as IGTV, Guides and Reels becoming increasingly popular on Instagram, it won’t be long before we are replacing hyperlinks with direct purchase links here, too. It comes as no surprise that currently, video is the preferred way to consume content, so just how long will it be until such features are integrated into the likes of YouTube and TikTiok? My thoughts? It will happen sooner than we think. Brands are continuing to steer away from traditional marketing methods and are working hard to build relationships with social media influencers to focus their budgets and campaigns on influencer marketing. This is just the beginning for shoppable content and social commerce, and I for one, can’t wait to see where it takes us.

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Spotlight

Cohley

Cohley is a content generation platform that connects brands to a network of creators and professionals. It all began in 2014, when then co-workers Erik Graber and Tom Logan recognized an opportunity for creatives to proactively search for the right brand collaborations, instead of the other way around. They saw firsthand the powerful role of content across branding and performance, and founded Cohley two years later.

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