How to Leverage Both PPC & SEO Data to Improve Your Marketing

ALICE ROUSSEL | September 27, 2019

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Often, PPC (paid search advertising) and SEO (“free” organic search engine optimization) are treated as separate, opposing channels. Different people might be in charge of each task for the same website, using separate company resources, with divergent objectives. However, this way of looking at PPC and SEO discounts a basic truth. Because of how search engines work, and due to the data (your website) they use to evaluate your submissions to their search results pages, there’s more interaction between the two marketing channels than you might think. We want to argue that sharing information between services, and sharing objectives in search engine marketing – whether you’re a practitioner of SEO or PPC – is beneficial to everyone.

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Rokkan, a partner for brave change, takes its name from the Japanese word for “the sixth sense,” bringing intuition to research and strategy to help brands create data-driven and highly creative storytelling, social engagement, customer experience and e-commerce.

OTHER ARTICLES

9 Social Media Marketing Tips to Help You Up Your Social Game

Article | April 2, 2020

Social media platforms are the preferred channel for a good majority of people to socialise and stay updated about what’s happening around the world. These platforms have billions of users and, therefore, represent a big opportunity for marketers. In fact, Facebook alone has 2.4 billion users. Just imagine how many people you can target if you leverage a few of these platforms. However, not everyone who tries social media marketing is a success. It is quite competitive and a lot of marketers struggle to make a mark on these platforms. But, don’t get discouraged as we are here to help you with that. Here are some of the most effective social media marketing tips to help you stand out in the crowd.

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CONTENT MARKETING

7 Ways to Create a Strong Brand

Article | April 2, 2020

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SEO and Accessibility: Technical SEO

Article | April 2, 2020

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Why outdated search experiences repel your customers

Article | April 2, 2020

Think about the last time you searched for a product online. If you’re like 93% of digital shoppers, the experience started out in a search box with a few keywords that felt relevant to your desired purchase. Seconds later, a surge of results flooded the browser with sponsored ads from major retailers and brands, and followed by organic results. The long journey to purchase begins as you try to navigate thousands of results across channels. Simply put: search experiences are not enjoyable. Consumers like finding products, not searching for them. The exhausting process of refining keywords, checking off filters, and comparing product descriptions in order to make a purchase has taken the joy of shopping and made it a headache. While the methods of shopping have evolved over the last two decades, the search experience has been pieced together from outdated practices.

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Spotlight

Rokkan

Rokkan, a partner for brave change, takes its name from the Japanese word for “the sixth sense,” bringing intuition to research and strategy to help brands create data-driven and highly creative storytelling, social engagement, customer experience and e-commerce.

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