3 WAYS TO PULL A RETAIL 360

| October 24, 2016

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Turning around a company isn’t as straightforward as stabilizing finances, containing costs or fixing operations. More often than not, a turnaround goes well beyond the fundamental business issues, delving into areas such as employee attitude and temperament. From my experience, there are three key areas that must be addressed in order to create the best possible opportunity for success.
DON’T KID YOURSELF When you deal in reality, you cut costs and rationalize your budget to fit the business trend–not what you would like it to be or what it used to be. Hey, it is what it is, today and literally. Start taking immediate steps to stop the bleeding and then give the business a chance to heal. Most importantly, put time on your side. You need as much of it as possible.

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Atypic

Atypic is a communication agency specialized in Corporate and Brand Activation, based in Louvain-la-Neuve. It is our mission to discover the possibilities where you cannot (any longer) see them, to link them and organise them in order to extract what is essential from them: your differentiation.

OTHER ARTICLES

Kentucky Teen Once Subject of Viral Video Warns Republicans of 'Outrage Mob'

Article | August 25, 2020

A Kentucky teen who became the subject of a viral video after an incident during a class field trip to Washington, D.C., warned viewers of the Republican National Convention Tuesday of an "outrage mob" that threatens to silence conservative viewpoints. After Nick Sandmann attended the March for Life anti-abortion rally with his former classmates from Covington Catholic High School in January 2019, a cellphone video of a close, face-to-face interaction between the students and a Native American demonstrator spread quickly online.

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How Digital Marketing Benefits Business During Coronavirus Pandemic

Article | April 16, 2020

The Coronavirus or COVID-19 seems like the threat for most of the business either it has an online or offline operation. This has made the impacts on most of the business either it is small, medium or large enterprises. It has flipped everyone’s life upside down. From practicing the social distancing, self-isolation, continually washing our hand, wearing the mask while meeting our loved ones, this was not all expected by us which happened due to coronavirus. If we consider the current situation, peoples are in their houses, community gathering is prohibited, offices, streets & workplaces are vacant to avoid the infection of coronavirus. So there are limited options that are there through which you can transform this crisis in the form of opportunities.

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How to Build Brands in a B2B Environment

Article | November 20, 2020

Often people believe that brands do not matter as much in a B2B environment as in a consumer one. In fact, the opposite is often true. In a consumer environment, the buyer is using his or her own money, so it is a major factor in the buying decision. In a B2B environment, the buyer is using the company’s money, and the key driver may be career advancement or even job protection. This means that avoiding making a mistake may be more important than making the best decision. As the old saying went, “no one ever got fired for choosing IBM.” So there are many B2B brands which have achieved and retained a status which justifies a price premium. Strong ingredient brands are among these. So Nutrasweet became a brand which justified a premium, as did Intel. However, these brands cannot simply be exploited without being nurtured. Just as with consumer brands, these brands can die or be superseded. Splenda came along and took much of the same space as Nutrasweet. The fact that it is both an ingredient and stand-alone brand gave it a stronger presence in the mind of the end-user. In B2B giving a product a name is easy, but that does not necessarily mean a brand in the customer’s mind. The key factor is whether, when we use the B2B grid, the use of the brand is compatible and enhancing to customer perception. All too often, in B2B, companies sabotage themselves. They focus on price, and in fact draw attention to it. Perhaps, if their costs are lowest, this may give the company leadership for a while. However, they end up placing themselves in the worst quadrant – the commodity segment, such as wheat or iron ore. Second worst is “service goods,” where price is the most likely distinguishing feature, but where the goods are so unimportant that the buyer may ignore price. Such examples are paper clips and cleaning supplies. Following this is the strategic goods quadrant, where price is secondary, even if high. High grade steels in the manufacture of jet aircraft are examples of this. The most envied position is to be a specialty product. An example may be a high priced additive or processing aid. Price is relatively irrelevant if it ensure top quality. When Richard Guha of Take Control Of was CMO of the enterprise software business at Remedy/BMC, he spent much time positioning the product in this way through its brand. The brand was positioned to be the only safe choice to make, but the name was not changed as change was unneeded. It was also priced so that customers could buy on an a la carte basis for modest increments or on a prix fixe basis for a complete turnkey product. In the energy business also, while more difficult, this is still the objective. When energy deregulation started, Houston Industries, the third largest combination utility was faced with the fact that it provided services well beyond Houston, and that, although its name implied it, it manufactured nothing. Thus it rebranded itself as Reliant Energy very successfully. This brand was used in consumer and B2B markets equally. The challenge which use of branding faces is to add perceived value to the product. Instead of merely “steel” a company such as Mittal Steel has to be perceived as providing some added value to the buyer. In each market, this may be different. The most extreme situations are when a product or service is “clearly” a commodity. One of the most obvious commodities is rigid metal packaging, aka, cans! Yet, can manufacturers have succeeded in differentiating themselves on the basis of service, technological innovation, and end-user sensitivity. Often, adding service to product can add perceived value. In B2B companies it should be far easier to measure and control the value of a brand. Usually, there is a direct connection to the customer. CRM systems, if well managed (another story), can identify them, and allow the company to understand the meaning of the brand, and the difference it makes to the price realized vs. an unbranded alternative. The sum of these differences is the effective Brand Value. Knowing all the levers to pull makes is possible to enhance it in far more direct ways than for a consumer brand. In short, we have seen that in B2B markets, a brand can go even further in adding value to a product or service than in a consumer market. Max Brand Equity works with corporations, turnaround managers, and private equity firms to understand and maximize the value of their brands – often the most valuable part of a business.

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Refresh, Repurpose, Redirect: Pivoting Content Creation amid COVID-19

Article | April 27, 2020

As we navigate our way through Covid-19 and the impact it has on marketing efforts, it’s time to step into a new normal by taking an approach that isn’t as new as you might think. The old saying “When one door closes, another one opens” comes to mind as we try to adapt to these unprecedented times. So, what happens when studio production closes and we’re unable to do business as usual? Well, as the saying goes – another door opens. We shift our focus towards a different path, one that includes adapting existing assets, animation, graphic design, and user generated content.

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Spotlight

Atypic

Atypic is a communication agency specialized in Corporate and Brand Activation, based in Louvain-la-Neuve. It is our mission to discover the possibilities where you cannot (any longer) see them, to link them and organise them in order to extract what is essential from them: your differentiation.

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