Facebook’s next meal ticket lies in higher ad prices

| November 3, 2016

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New York: Facebook Inc. confirmed Wednesday that it’s the Internet’s hottest growth story. To stay that way, the company will have to double down in a crucial area: Selling more high-priced advertisements.
To explain why, let me remind you of the three basic ways Facebook can increase its revenue:
Facebook in the last year or so has focused its attention on number 1 and especially number 2. The company’s efforts to cram more ads into Facebook and Instagram have been a major source of its extraordinary sales growth, which slowed a bit to 56% in the third quarter from 59% three months earlier. That’s a remarkable pace for any large company, especially one that pulled in a record 45% operating income margin in the quarter.

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Companionship: Still big on the radar for consumers when choosing an influencer to follow

Article | January 18, 2021

We may have entered a New Year, but we are still living in a world filled with lockdowns and restrictions. Still unable to hug our loved ones, online companionship is quite possibly, more important than ever before. The last 12 months has shown online communities come together with social media influencers becoming the ultimate lockdown companions. Amelia Neate, Senior Manager at Influencer Matchmaker explains why companionship is still big on the radar for 2021 and why she thinks it is here to stay. Since March of last year, most of the population have found themselves spending more time indoors, whether that’s due to lockdown, working from home, furlough or maybe they have been shielding. But because of that, human interaction has been limited and it doesn’t seem to be on the cards for anytime soon, either. And with a quarter of UK adults saying that lockdown has made them feel lonely, many have turned to social media influencers in a bid to feel less alone. Helping each other out Online companionship is much more than simply a one-way street. Whilst it primarily benefits consumers, social media followers and audiences, it also provides rapport for the influencers and brands, too. Many influencers felt a responsibility to uplift their audiences, keep them company and deliver some much-needed entertainment during a time filled with such despair and crisis. This, in turn, allowed social media influencers to create a deeper connection with their followers, and the feeling of responsibility provided them with something to focus on and strive for whilst they too, found themselves living a life under restriction. With the temporary closure of retail alongside many other industries, social media has supplied brands and businesses with an opportunity to establish a brand-new relationship with customers that they may not have had otherwise. Brands have been able to understand exactly what their customers want by spending more time communicating with them and getting them involved with the content they create and the brands they choose to work with. As well as this, brands have been able to work closely (albeit virtually) with influencers to provide them with just that. It isn’t just the relationship between brands, influencers and their audiences, though. Brands have used this time to build relationships with other brands, particularly through the use of social media. Smaller, local, independent businesses of a similar vein have teamed up with one another to create bespoke packages, combining their products and services as a way to build brand awareness and help gain recognition. Influencers have also been doing something very similar. ‘Follow Fridays’ have made a triumphant return to Instagram, with many influencers dedicating their time to promoting fellow content creators and sharing their work. A sense of community Influencers have worked hard to adapt their content to meet the newfound needs of their audience and to build a community. The last year has seen an influx in the number of virtual book clubs, Facebook groups and podcasts, many of which have been created as a way to tackle boredom and loneliness - for both the creators and users. With people forced to embrace daily Zoom calls with work as well as weekend catchups with family members, many have been seeking a distraction that isn’t too far from their norm. Book clubs such as ‘Beth’s Book Club', founded by Beth Sandland, have blossomed during the coronavirus pandemic. Going from simply reading one book a month, this particular online community has upped the ante and has become a place to discuss their favourite reads and create new friends. As well as the usual monthly discussion, this book club often features virtual get togethers, Q&A’s with popular authors and even yoga sessions, regularly providing members with something to look forward to. Such communities have also been welcomed with open arms by royalty. The Duchess of Cornwall, Camilla Parker Bowles, has also launched her very own Instagram book club. The Reading Room features conversations with authors and connects like-minded book lovers. Facebook groups have also proven to be a popular source of escapism, with many celebrities and social media influencers creating members-only groups for their followers to join. X-Factor star Sam Bailey created a ‘buddy up’ campaign via her Facebook group, Bailey’s Cuppa Crew. Aiming to help her fans combat loneliness, Sam encouraged them to make friends and even paired people up who would otherwise be spending Christmas alone, providing them with a way to enjoy their festive dinner over Zoom. Influencers Lily Pebbles and The Anna Edit use a Facebook group to help with their ongoing podcast, ‘At Home With...’. The group enables listeners of the podcast to truly get involved, by sharing detailed feedback and requesting topics for episodes which really places them at the very heart of the podcast. Similarly, health and fitness app Battle Ready 360, founded by Ollie Ollerton also have a members-only group, allowing users of the app to compete in friendly challenges, make friends and take some time for themselves. Throughout the entirety of this pandemic, influencers have provided their followers with nothing but positivity, hope and a little inspiration. A thought for the future An end is in sight, although it may be a little further away than we initially thought. But one thing that the pandemic has taught us, is the importance of companionship and the true power of social media influencers. They are much more than online creators and entertainers, but friends, supporters and advocates for all that we believe in. And with that being said, I firmly believe that the act of online companionship is something that will stick around, throughout 2021 and beyond.

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10 Do’s and Don’ts of Market Research Translation

Article | December 22, 2020

Most influential organizations need international market research as it helps formulate growth strategies and decision-making processes. Market research translation allows businesses to understand clients’ expectations, conduct competitive analysis, make educated business decisions, and much more. Surveying multilingual consumers is challenging in multiple ways, requires language expertise, and has zero room for errors. A single mistake, miscommunication, or misunderstandings can adversely impact a company’s progress in local and international markets. Many organizations hire business translation services firms for their expertise in the sector. Here are some do’s and don’ts of translating market research to understand the complexity of the task. The Do’s: 1. Native Speakers When translating surveys, questions, and instructions, working with native speakers allows questionnaires to sound more natural and helps respondents feel comfortable when answering. Additionally, having native translators who have or are living in your target research area will help them understand the respondents better. Your translators will understand the local language and colloquialisms as well as make the questionnaire easily accessible. 2. Background Information Your market research translation services firm should have all the necessary background information to understand your research scope and objective, along with ensuring its accuracy. Your translators should know what kind of information you need from respondents to ask the correct questions in the target language. In addition, the linguists who translate the answers would also require a complete discussion to comprehend the precise meaning of the statements made. 3. Avoid Leading Questions Ensure that your survey has minimal leading questions, if any. Such questions decrease the accuracy of your research by guiding respondents toward specific answers. Typically, leading questions might confuse your respondents. They might answer in a different way than they would in normal circumstances. This may alter your research results and give you an erroneous image of the local market, which can impact your company’s positioning adversely in the long term. 4. Review of Target Participants Depending on your survey region, you may need to adapt your research methods to include real-time conversations, phone interviews, besides online questionnaires. You may need to create new classes of participants for your study due to population structure variations. If required, you can reorganize your target audience categories, their number, and how you contact them. 5. Test Study Methods Your business translation services team should test the questionnaire on a sample before you go live to ensure that all your respondents understand the instructions and questions. This also helps you avoid vague messages and poorly translated, indistinct questions. Invest some extra billing hours in testing to ensure the accuracy of your research. The Don’ts: 1. Not Going Beyond Word-to-Word Translation Market research documentation involves surveys, questions, videos, interactive content, and more. Along with terminology and grammatical rules, translators require details, like the respondents' voice pitch, body language, and idiomatic expressions for successful translations for the project. 2. Overlook Cultural Aspects Researchers cannot ask the required questions or conduct a qualitative analysis of the answers without cultural insight. They simplify communication between the respondents and the translator and enable you to represent the local market accurately. Integrating cultural nuances into the research helps you create an emotional connection with the respondents and results in more accurate answers for your analysis. 3. Ignore Data Security Adhering to data security protocols builds trust among your local audience and reduces the risk of problems with local authorities. If your questionnaires have sensitive data, avoid any data security breaches. This builds trust among your local audience and reduces the risk of issues with the law. If you take assistance from a language service provider, they should ensure that your research results and the respondents’ data are protected. Usually, your translation agency will have strong data security measures to keep your files safe and secure. 4. Forgetting to Proofread Translating market research involves concepts that cannot always be compared in all languages, brand perceptions that differ with the region, varying local social norms for communication, and several other aspects that influence the translation and localization process. Get survey results checked and proofread by the research team before sharing them with your management and stakeholders. This ensures that analysts use accurate data to make their predictions and removes any mistakes from the document. 5. Have Fixed Deadlines Your market research results will determine your product launches, fresh marketing strategies, and development. Proper documentation for multilingual market research needs time and patience, as rushing through the entire process can be counterproductive. Rushed translations and skipping critical phases of research might result in the omission of essential data and altering the analysis results. This could lead to a false assurance that pushes you in the incorrect course. Multilingual market research requires translating both the instructions and surveys that enable you to investigate local markets and local respondents' data.

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Resources for advancing racial equity in your workforce

Article | September 14, 2020

Send this survey to your organization’s vendors and partners to uncover whether the organizations you work with have diverse teams, leadership, and vendors of their own. With the insights you gain, you can prioritize partnerships that align with your organization’s diversity, equity, and inclusion values.

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The ROI of Leadership Transparency in Difficult Times

Article | August 7, 2020

From consulting to a startup role at Eloqua marketing automation, an IPO experience, and a sale to Oracle Mike Couch has seen it all. Now Managing Partner and CEO at Couch & Associates, his expertise in marketing technology and the CRM space is highly sought by companies wanting to make more data-driven decisions. He recently shared ideas for how sales and marketing teams can find new growth during these uncertain times.

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